Shanti Project Celebrating 40 Years!

About The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program®

The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® is the nation's leading HIV self-management and health-enhancement program. L.I.F.E. provides participants with the knowledge, motivation, skills, and support necessary to establish and maintain health-protective routines.

Our Program Goals:

  1. Optimizing health outcomes for people living with HIV by assisting participants in improving their performance on biological, psychological, and social Cofactors that can impact health.
  2. Reducing the number of people who become infected with HIV by assisting participants in reducing HIV transmission risk behaviors and other health-risking behaviors.

Is L.I.F.E. Effective?
Clinical program evaluation of L.I.F.E. shows that participants:

  • Reduce overall health problems (by 27-44%) and overall personal problems (by 38-50%);
  • Decrease drug/alcohol use and other health risking behaviors;
  • Increase adherence to HIV treatment and other health routines;
  • Increase the amount and quality of trusted support in their lives; and
  • Improve coping with grief, depression, and Survival Stress.
Through L.I.F.E.'s innovative and effective learning methods and group processes, L.I.F.E. participants improve their health outcomes in as few as 12 weeks.

How L.I.F.E. Works
L.I.F.E., which stands for Learning Immune Function Enhancement, is based on scientific research that connects our performance on certain biological, psychological, and social Cofactors, to immune system functioning, disease progression, and overall health. These Cofactors have been shown in HIV disease and other life-threatening illnesses to trigger symptom onset, speed up or slow down disease progression, and impact survival time. Cofactors have also been shown to impact physical, social, and psychological aspects of quality of life. When people living with HIV/AIDS or other illnesses understand the dynamic relationship between mind and body, and improve their performance on certain Cofactors, then they may benefit from improved physical and psychological health and well-being.

Cofactors to HIV+ Health and Wellness
A Cofactor is a life issue that can impact health. Research shows Cofactors can slow down (HIV, cancer, or Hepatitis C) disease progression; help to reverse existing disease symptoms or AIDS-related conditions; enhance immune system functioning; increase adherence to health routines including medication/treatment protocols used to treat disease or symptoms; and improve one's ability and willingness to choose health-supporting behaviors over health-risking behaviors.

L.I.F.E. participants explore their performance on 26 Cofactors and receive the knowledge, motivation, skills, and support necessary to set and reach goals related to their Cofactor performance and health. By increasing health-supporting Cofactor performance and reducing or eliminating health-risking Cofactor performance, participants can greatly increase their potential to develop and maintain wellness.

Upcoming Trainings in San Francisco

L.I.F.E.® Health Workshops for 2014
Cycle 37
Tuesday, Sept. 23rd thru
Tuesday, Dec. 9th

The Shanti L.I.F.E. Health Workshop is a free sixteen-week workshop based on the strategies and behaviors that long term survivors use to maintain and improve immune system functioning and health. Long-term survival can be learned. This program focuses on peer support and bonding and emphasizes making contacts and lasting connections with other HIV+ individuals.

For more information, please contact Jackson Bowman, email or at 415-674-4755.

L.I.F.E. Latino
Ciclo11
Martes, 10 de junio hasta
Martes, 2 de septiembre

El programa L.I.F.E. (r) de Shanti es un taller gratuito de 13 semanas de duración basado en las estrategias y comportamientos que los sobrevivientes de largo plazo utilizan para mantener y mejorar el funcionamiento de su sistema inmune y su salud. La supervivencia a largo plazo puede ser aprendida. Este programa se enfoca en el apoyo y unión entre compañeros y enfatiza el hacer contactos y conexiones duraderas con otras personas VIH positivas.

Para mas información, por favor contacte a Eduardo Antonio por email o por teléfono al (415) 552-1013 x310

Psychological Cofactors

Belief About Disease and Health Pgrogression

Belief about Disease and Health Progression:
Belief about Disease and Health Progression: The system of related ideas we hold about the world, whether conscious or unconscious, realistic or inaccurate, can influence our health. Optimistic or fatalistic beliefs can indirectly impact our health by informing our health behaviors, and directly impact the functioning of body systems including immunity.

Grief and Loss

Grief and Loss:
Grief is a psychological response to significant loss. Grief can include feelings of sorrow, fear, regret, anxiety, confusion, anger, emptiness, or depression. Research shows that sustained unresolved grief, especially when combined with depression, can have a significant negative impact on immunity and health, whereas the expression of grief can mediate negative health outcomes and lead to the resolution of the grief.

Grief and Loss

Depression:
Depression can be a fleeting response to a temporary situation, or a long-lasting, physically debilitating condition needing professional care. It can be characterized by sadness or emotional numbness, lethargy, difficulty concentrating and making decisions, feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness or inappropriate guilt, and lack of pleasure in things that once brought pleasure. Depression can impact our willingness or ability to adhere to health-protective routines including HIV treatments. More depression and/or anxiety predicts increased health-risking behaviors, decreased suppression of HIV when on HAART, lower CD4+ and Natural Killer cell (NK) counts. Treatment with talk therapy and/or antidepressants is effective at reversing many of these conditions.

Sustained Survival Stress and Crisis

Sustained Survival Stress and Crisis Coping:
Sustained survival stress is different both in intensity and duration from regular stress. Survival stress results from feeling feel like your safety or security is somehow threatened. Sustained survival stressors send repeated alarm signals to your nervous system. The resulting body changes can upregulate circulatory and respiratory system functioning, dampen appetite, digestion, and interfere with sleep patterns, emotional stability, cognitive judgment and immune system functioning. More chronic stress and/or passive coping predicts downregulation of cellular and humoral immunity, elevated cortisol levels, faster clinical disease progression, and greater vulnerability to other physical illness/disease. Being able to accurately assess stressors, and having active coping skills can mediate these negative health outcomes.

Life Purpose and Goals

Life Purpose and Goals:
Life Purpose and Goals: Life goals are specific experiences or objectives to be accomplished that grow out of a sense of personal purpose, interest, or curiosity. Goals motivate us to engage in life and cherish being alive. Research shows that long-term survivors of an AIDS diagnosis typically have clear life goals and pursue them with action. Having life purpose and goals predicts more desire to maintain/regain health and stronger adherence to health-protective routines, including HIV treatment.

Back to Top

Social Cofactors

Trusted Support and Self-Disclosure

Trusted Support and Self Disclosure:
Trusted support means having a relationship with someone in which you feel fundamentally safe, supported, and willing to discuss any issues that create worry, anxiety, stress, or other psychological burden to you (perhaps including issues of sexual identity, drug use, HIV and health status, survival stress, or other concerns). Self-Disclosure is the act of sharing those concerns. Together, having a trusted support person AND sharing your concerns with them predict higher CD4+ counts, increase in NK cell activity, drop in viral load, slower HIV symptom onset, less severity of symptoms, slower clinical disease progression, less health-risking behaviors, stronger adherence to health routines, including HAART, and decrease in psychological issues that drive immune function, including depression and stress.

Self-Assertiveness

Self Assertiveness:
Assertiveness is knowing what you want, and having the ability to ask clearly for what you want, and to say no to what you don't want. Assertiveness is not the same as aggressiveness, and does not have to be exercised at the expense of other people's needs. Self-assertiveness also predicts more collaborative patient-providers relationships, greater satisfaction with personal relationship, and less stress which can impact immune system functioning.

Primary Health Care

Patient/Provider Relationship:
Your relationship with a medical provider is a significant dynamic in the state of your health. This relationship can be characterized by poor communication and frustration, or good communication and a collaborative spirit. Different relationship qualities can have an impact on the state of your medical care, and thereby your health.

Altruism

Altruism:
Altruism is the unselfish regard for the well being of others. Altruism, in the form of volunteerism, caregiving, random acts of kindness, or philanthropy, can benefit entire communities as well as individuals. Acting altruistically predicts fewer problems with stress-related health conditions such as high blood pressure, lower cortisol levels (stress hormone), and improved sense of overall well-being. Altruism also encourages social engagement and connection and combats loneliness and social isolation.

Spirituality

Spirituality:
L.I.F.E. defines spirituality as an appreciation of the interconnectedness of life and a desire to be part of something larger than oneself. Spirituality can serve as a healthy coping skill, and can predict better overall mental and physical health, slower decline in CD4+ cells, less distress, lower cortisol levels, more health-supporting behaviors, and longer survival in those living with HIV.

Back to Top

Biological Cofactors

Health Risking Behaviors

Health Risking Behaviors:
A health risking behavior is any action or belief that can have a negative impact on your body & health. Our knowledge, risk calculation, awareness, and choice-making can all impact our willingness to take risks with our health. The L.I.F.E. Program® presents the latest research on how general, sexual, and drug and alcohol use risks can impact immune system functioning and health, as well as strategies for reducing risk behavior and harm.

Toxins and Germs/Drugs and Alcohol

Drugs & Alcohol

Toxins and Germs/Drugs and Alcohol:
Toxins - including drugs and alcohol - are substances that one puts into the body, that have little or no nutritional value, may be potentially harmful, and put a strain on the body to process. Drug and alcohol use can suppress immune system functioning, interfere with the effectiveness or safety of HIV medication, and act as a driver to other health risking behaviors. Germs are microscopic organisms (bacteria, fungi, viruses, or other pathogens) that can sometimes cause serious disease. A secondary infection, whether from a cold or flu, an STD, or a more serious co-infection with Hepatitis C, can trigger an immune response (which can stimulate HIV replication), cause more serious illness, or further burden an immune system that is already fighting HIV. It is important to gain awareness of the toxins and germs we put into our bodies, and learn skills and strategies to reduce exposure/use and/or mediate the negative impacts on health.

Breathing

Breathing:
There is a direct connection between emotions and breathing patterns. Anxiety, fear, or grief can restrict breathing and create a sensation of tightness. But also, conscious breathing techniques can be used to assist coping with negative emotions and stress. Full breathing is one of only two body functions that promote lymphatic flow and drainage, a process by which immune cells travel the body, find and destroy infected cells and pathogens, and remove non-self waste matter from the body. Full unrestricted breathing also delivers oxygen to all body cells including immune cells.

Water

Water:
Water is the universal solvent, and the primary component of our bodies. It is an indispensable element for life, allowing nutrients to be absorbed from food, and body toxins and waste to be flushed from the body. Sufficient water is also necessary for different body cells or systems of cells to communicate with each other. Intracellular communication is particularly important for effective immune system response.

Food and Nutrition

Food and Nutrition:
Along with fresh air and clean water, daily nutrition is at the core of general wellness. It must provide minimum requirements of protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins and minerals. Immune cells - like all body cells - require adequate nutrition in order to function.

Exercise

Exercise:
The human body was designed for movement, and exercise is critical for maintaining good circulation and digestion, building lean muscle mass and burning excess calories and fat. Simply put, the body does not do as well physically without regular exercise. Skeletal muscle contraction is one of only two body functions that promote lymphatic flow and drainage, a process by which immune cells travel the body, find and destroy infected cells and pathogens, and remove non-self waste matter from the body. The immune system (and many other body systems) responds well to exercise - even 30 minutes of moderate exertion (such as a brisk walk) 3 times a week.

Sleep

Sleep:
Sleep is the period when the body and brain take time to repair and replenish themselves. Sleep helps the immune system operate at peak efficiency. Regular, sufficient sleep rounds out an integrated body care plan.

Adherence to Health Routines

Adherence to Health Routines:
A health routine is any activity that helps the body to maintain health or heal from sickness. Adherence means "sticking to your schedule" of health routines. Adherence is crucial to the effectiveness of any medical therapy, including prescribed drugs such as antivirals or antibiotics. Sticking to your health plans assists in maintaining or improving health.

Back to Top

Frequently Asked Questions

What is The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program®?

How does L.I.F.E. work?

Is L.I.F.E. effective at improving health outcomes?

Does The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® replace medical care or medication?

Is there research to back up the premise of The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program®?

How does The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® stay on top of the latest research?

Does L.I.F.E. evaluate program outcomes and effectiveness?

Is The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® a formal study?

Do you maintain peer review of your work and the program?

What role does Shanti play in the national replication of L.I.F.E

How can I find funding to implement L.I.F.E. in my agency or clinic?

Where can I find L.I.F.E.?

What is the future of L.I.F.E.?



What is The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program®?

The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® interventions are group level behavioral interventions designed to help participants improve health outcomes by improving performance on 26 biological, psychological, and social Cofactors to HIV+ Health. L.I.F.E. is effective at reducing health problems, reducing health-risking behaviors (including HIV transmission risk behaviors and use of drugs and alcohol), increasing adherence to health-protective routines including medication protocols, increasing trusted support, and increasing coping with grief, depression, and stress. Participants are motivated to stick with and engage in the interventions by the documented health-enhancing potential of the program and the structured, interactive, topic-driven nature of the program. The L.I.F.E. Program® has been tailored to address a number of different client population needs, and is offered in a number of different implementation formats, including the most commonly implemented original 16-week version, and condensed 12-week version.

Back

How does L.I.F.E. work?

The L.I.F.E. Program® recognizes that a number of life issues such as stress, depression, substance use, and life goals impact HIV+ person's willingness and ability to maintain wellness. Research shows individuals struggling with these life issues (we call them Cofactors) are less adherent to treatment plans, more likely to engage in health risking behaviors, and experience suppressed immune system functioning, all of which can lead to a decline in health. Through a free 13 or 16 week workshop, L.I.F.E. provides individuals living with HIV the motivation, skills, and emotional & practical support necessary to deal with these life issues and improve their psychological, social, and physical health.

Back

Is L.I.F.E. effective at improving health outcomes?

Yes. One clinical trial and numerous national program evaluations concur: Thousands of L.I.F.E. graduates have improved their Cofactor performance and overall health. A 2009 program evaluation found: Participants reduced health problems by a remarkable 39%, on average. Participants also decreased risk behavior, decreased psychosocial drivers of risk behavior, decreased use of drugs and alcohol, and increased adherence to health routines including adherence to HIV medication protocols.

Back

Does The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® replace medical care or medication?

Absolutely not. The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® is designed to complement and augment primary medical care for the HIV+ individual. We believe the best treatment for HIV infection is a combination of (1) quality medical care, including antiretroviral medicine when appropriate, and (2) quality psychological care designed to enhance immune function by way of improved psychological functioning and health-related behaviors. We encourage participants in The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® to inform their medical providers about their participation in L.I.F.E., and welcome inquiries from medical and health professionals about the treatment partnership.

Back

Is there research to back up the premise of The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program®?

Yes. The program is based on 40 years of medical research in the health sciences, particularly psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), which demonstrate that psychosocial issues can influence immune function via nervous and hormonal mechanisms. PNI is part of the broader field called mind/body medicine. Many of the PNI studies over the past 25 years have focused directly on HIV-infected individuals, and strongly suggest that a patient's mental and emotional health and social situation are positively or negatively associated with outcomes in morbidity and mortality. PNI research centers and programs are now in place at several medical institutions around the country.

Back

How does The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® stay on top of the latest research?

L.I.F.E. staff collaborates with interns from the UC Berkeley Health Services Internship program to conduct quarterly reviews of current immunology, psychology, Psychoneuroimmunology, and health-sciences literature. Relevant articles are annotated, archived, incorporated into the L.I.F.E. curriculum, and shared with program participants, sites implementing L.I.F.E., health professionals, and the community at large.

Back

Does L.I.F.E. evaluate program outcomes and effectiveness?

Yes. L.I.F.E. utilizes standardized psychometric instruments to assess participants' change in behavior, psychological functioning, and health status, from pre to post program, and when possible, at 6 and 12-months post-program. Unlike behavioral interventions that are evidence-based (based on an intervention that demonstrated effectiveness in trials), L.I.F.E. is evidence-producing: outcomes for each client attending L.I.F.E. in each site offering the program are collected and analyzed. In fact, participants rely on their pre-workshop measures to set goals during the program and measure their accomplishments at graduation.

Back

Is The Shanti L.I.F.E. Program® a formal study?

Although the L.I.F.E. Program® is designed primarily as a program serving clients, it is also designed for systematic pre- and post-program data collection and analysis. In 2004, L.I.F.E. was awarded a contract with the California State Office of AIDS to conduct a clinical trial of the program's effectiveness in boosting immunity and reducing risk behavior. This trial was conducted at four Early Intervention Program sites throughout the State. In 2005, a similar contract award from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) allowed us to collect additional data on the program's effectiveness. Both studies concur that L.I.F.E. is effective at improving health outcomes, increasing adherence to health routines, and decreasing health risking behaviors and use of drugs and alcohol. In 2009, after implementing an enhanced curriculum, The Shanti L.I.F.E. Institute conducted a national outcomes evaluation across all national L.I.F.E. sites. These results showing outcomes similar to earlier evaluations were presented in 2009 at the United States Conference on AIDS in San Francisco, and the National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.

Back

Do you maintain peer review of your work and the program?

Yes. L.I.F.E. Program® outcomes are reviewed by six state health departments and a number of city health departments including the San Francisco DPH each year. Annually curriculum updates are reviewed by the San Francisco DPH Materials Review Board. A committee of physicians, practitioners, health researchers, social workers, and HIV+ peers inform the enhancement of current program materials as well as the development of new interventions. To join the committee, please click here.

Back

What role does Shanti play in the national replication of L.I.F.E.?

The Shanti L.I.F.E. Institute provides research, curriculum development, training, technical assistance, and outcomes evaluation to support community based organizations, hospitals, and clinics across the country in implementing L.I.F.E.. To learn more about bringing L.I.F.E. to your region, please contact our Director of Program Development by email or at (415) 674-4716.

Back

How can I find funding to implement L.I.F.E. in my agency or clinic?

L.I.F.E. is most commonly funded by CDC, state, or city HIV prevention funding. Agencies have also received funding to implement L.I.F.E. from a number of other government and private sources, in the following ways:

  • As an HIV Prevention with Positives program: Reducing HIV transmission risk behavior, and increasing HIV disclosure.
  • As a mental health intervention: Improving coping with grief, depression, stress, life purpose and goals, and beliefs about HIV disease progression; Improving trusted support, self-assertiveness, altruism and spirituality.
  • As a physical health intervention: Reducing health problems, risk behavior, and drug and alcohol use; Improving nutrition, exercise, general body care, and adherence to health routines;
  • As a substance use / relapse prevention intervention: reducing drug/alcohol use and addressing psychological and social drivers to substance use such as depression, grief, trusted support, survival stress, self-assertiveness (cultural influences, shame, stigma, self-esteem), and beliefs about HIV disease progression.
  • As a treatment education and adherence intervention: Increasing general knowledge about HIV, HIV treatments, and adherence; increasing adherence to HAART; addressing drivers to non-adherence including depression, belief about HIV, survival stress, and substance use; improving patient-provider relationship; mediating possible side-effects of treatment and reducing overall health and personal problems.
  • As a Psychosocial Component to Improving Clinical Health Outcomes: Improving adherence to HAART, improving patient-provider relationship, reducing exposure to toxins and germs, reducing drug/alcohol use, improving body care including nutrition, water intake, exercise, and sleep habits; reducing health-risking behaviors, reducing overall health and personal problems.
  • As a Psychosocial Component to Improving Mental Health Outcomes: Increasing trusted support; improving coping with depression, grief and loss, and survival stress; developing/reinvigorating life purpose and goals; increasing adherence to health-protective behaviors including medication protocols; improving patient-provider relationship; , improving body care including nutrition, water intake, exercise, and sleep habits mediating possible side-effects of treatment and reducing overall health and personal problems.

Back

Where can I find L.I.F.E.?

Community based organizations, hospitals, and medical clinics across the nation have successfully implemented the L.I.F.E. Program® with diverse participant populations including men who have sex with men (MSM); women; African-Americans; Latino/a populations, with monolingual Spanish speakers and bilingual speakers; and with people co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C (HCV). L.I.F.E. currently operates in 18 agencies nationally, in California, Illinois, Louisiana, Missouri, Massachusetts, and Florida. Click here to find a site near you.

Back

What is the future of L.I.F.E.?

The effectiveness of L.I.F.E's bio-psycho-social approach to achieving positive health outcomes with a variety of HIV+ individuals offers hope that the L.I.F.E. model may achieve similar successes with participants living with other long-term or life-threatening illnesses such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's, and hepatitis C, as well as with participants wishing to promote their own healthy aging.

Back to Top

L.I.F.E. Workshops and Interventions

What is the L.I.F.E. Health Workshop?

What is the L.I.F.E. Institute Seminar Series?

What is Recovering L.I.F.E.?

What is L.I.F.E. Individual Health Counseling?


What is the L.I.F.E. Health Workshop?

The L.I.F.E. Health Workshop is a multisession, group-level HIV self-management and health-enhancement workshop that integrates HIV prevention with positives (PwP), treatment, and medication adherence interventions into a single program. L.I.F.E. is designed to help participants reduce health risking behaviors, reduce symptoms and side-effects, enhance immune system functioning, and increase adherence to health routines including medication protocols. Participants are motivated to stick with and engage in the workshop by the documented health-enhancing potential of the program.

L.I.F.E. Health Workshops are suitable for groups of between 6 and 40 participants, and meet for 12 or 16 weekly sessions. Each 3-hour session provides the latest medical research and proven group processes to motivate and support participants to make lasting changes in their health.

Before the workshop, participants take the L.I.F.E. Cofactor Questionnaire, and receive a personal Cofactor profile that outlines how they are performing on 26 biological, psychological, and social issues that can impact the immune system and overall health. During the workshop, participants use their profile to set goals, develop action plans, and as a general roadmap to improved HIV+ Health. At graduation, participants receive another personal profile that shows how they’ve improved their performance since the beginning of the workshop.

Workshop sessions are supported by the L.I.F.E. Participant Guidebook, a comprehensive health education resource and workbook, and a separate L.I.F.E. Health Journal for creating Health Action Plans and tracking progress, health behaviors, symptoms, medical appointments, lab results, and questions for their provider.

Participants meet periodically between meetings with an individual health counselor as needed to receive additional emotional and practical support in improving their health.

What is the L.I.F.E. Institute Seminar Series?

The L.I.F.E. Institute Seminars are one-day courses designed as “continuing education” for those who have already completed the L.I.F.E. Health Workshop, or those who are already well-versed in HIV self-management. Each seminar dives more deeply into one specific Cofactor to HIV+. Before the seminar, participants complete a short questionnaire, and receive a personal profile that identifies how they are performing on a number of key components of the Cofactor. During the one-day course, participants use experiential exercises and group work to gain self-awareness, skills, and support, and develop a personal action plan to improve their performance over the next with peers. Participants meet again 30 days after their seminar to share progress on their action plans, and receive another Cofactor profile that shows how they’ve improved their performance since the seminar.

Participants can participate in one seminar as a stand-alone class, or can attend any number of seminars, in any order. Currently, L.I.F.E. offers seminars on (1) trusted support and emotional expression and (2) self-assertiveness. We are currently developing seminars on (3) HIV Self-Management 101, (4) Eating and Nutrition, (5) Grief and Loss, and (6) How Beliefs Impact Our Health.

What is Recovering L.I.F.E.?

Shanti is currently developing Recovering L.I.F.E., a 9-week self-management and health-enhancement workshop for HIV+ individuals recovering from substance abuse. Recovering L.I.F.E. is designed to assist people in preventing relapse into substance use, and addressing the biological, psychological, and social Cofactors that impact HIV+ Health.

Recovering L.I.F.E. facilitators and peer facilitators incorporate their own personal experience with recovery into L.I.F.E.’s innovative experiential and group processes, to provide participants with the knowledge, motivation, skills, and support necessary to recover their own purpose, goals, and engagement in life post-substance use.

What is L.I.F.E. Individual Health Counseling?

Shanti offers individual health counseling to people who are interested in making health-supporting changes in their lives. The goal of individual health counseling is to support participants in developing health-protective routines and addressing the psychological, social, and biological Cofactors that can impact overall health and well-being. During Individual Health counseling, the participant and counselor may use the L.I.F.E. Cofactor Questionnaire and the resulting Personal Cofactor Profile to set goals, develop action plans, and as a general roadmap to improved HIV+ Health. Although individual health counseling is emotionally supportive and caring, it is not psychotherapy. Referrals for mental health counseling can be made during a health counseling session.

Participants may use individual health counseling as a tool to prepare for participation in a full L.I.F.E. Health Workshop, to stay engaged in their health action plans after graduating from the L.I.F.E. Health Workshop, or as a stand-alone service.

Back to Top


Click here to find a site near you, or contact Alyssa Nickell by email or at (415) 674-4716 to learn more about bringing L.I.F.E. to your community.


Sign Up! Stay Connected!   * required    *      *       *       
The Shanti Project • 730 Polk Street, San Francisco, CA 94109 USA • 415.674.4700 • Copyright 1974 — 2013 • All Rights Reserved • Shanti is a U.S. 501(c)3 non-profit organization
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map   Site Design by Matthew Simmons and Keeya Jones